Thank You Forbes! WWE Gets Called Out. Now, Will They Finally Listen?

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Allow me to quote the first paragraph of a September 8th article from Forbes Magazine:

Monday Night Raw and Thursday Night SmackDown are supposed to be the cornerstones of WWE programming, but things aren’t exactly going as planned.

Then comes the following comment, which is the basis of my argument over the lack of WWE Creative storytelling and the overall building of new superstars being properly elevated to the main event. I couldn’t have said it better myself.

….ratings for both Raw and SmackDown are in a downward spiral and have been for so long that anyone in WWE who isn’t concerned must be kidding themselves.

While Forbes goes on to say, along with the same sentiment of USA Network officials is “Professional wrestling isn’t as popular as it once was.” Now, whose fault is that. The Forbes article tries to explain that Wrestling “tends to be a cyclical business”. That’s just not true.

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WWE is more than capable of creating content that will create buzz at any time. The WWE Network’s success plus all of the marketing, branding and building of events like Wrestlemania and Summerslam to draw sellout crowds and generate mainstream media interest from the likes if ESPN is unquestionable.

WWE network is said to be the saving grace according to the article saying

if Raw and SmackDown continue down this slippery slope, the WWE Network will be there to save the day and one day provide the WWE with a one-stop shop for all of its programming.

WWE Network is not ready to be the home of all WWE’s programming. That will simply close off their gateway to new viewers. WWE still needs the TV time and the rights fees that cable brings them until the majority of TV viewers have chosen to cut the cord.

The bottom line is, Forbes finally called out the problem but WWE needs to start working on the obvious solution.-KOP